3 Absolute Interview Killers – Avoid saying these at all costs

In the past I have written posts about things you shouldn’t say, things you should say and ways to phrase certain things. However, after some recent feedback on an interview I felt it made sense to share this post on things you absolutely have to avoid saying. These are things where if you say them, you will absolutely not be getting that job. Now, I will say this is of course subject to the Welding Engineer exception. If you have read any of my posts in the past I have referred to the fact that some of the standard rules may not apply to people who happen to have a really rare skill set, like Welding Engineers. Bit for the rest of us, like you and me, if we say these things in the middle of an interview, you might as well save everyone’s time by picking up your stuff and going home. So with that being said let’s look at the things you must avoid saying at all cost if you want to be successful in your interview.

My last job/boss was terrible!

Most of us have had several bosses or jobs that were terrible. Maybe the culture was toxic or perhaps there was no work life balance. This happens. It’s out there and if you have avoided these situations, that is awesome. However, most working adults have situations we look back not so fondly on. However, if at any point in your interview you mention that your prior boss sucked you aren’t getting that job. That’s pretty black and white and yes, perhaps there are instances where you will get the job. However, you just put yourself at a disadvantage, unnecessarily I might add. If you were going to run a marathon, would you want to eat a bunch of McDonalds right before the race began? Of course not. Could you still end up finishing? Yea, of course. But is it a smart idea? Of course it isn’t. Be positive and take the high road for your own good.

 

I decided to take this interview just to see what’s out there

I want to start by saying that obviously this one isn’t as bad as the first. However, you still need to avoid saying it.  Imagine you go on a date and the person you are out with says something along the lines of “the only reason I am here is to see what’s on the menu at this restaurant”. How excited are you about that response? Might you have taken the interview out of curiosity? Sure. However, that goes under the category things you may actually feel but make no sense for you to disclose. That answer benefits no one. And quite frankly, it’s not true. Nobody goes on an interview solely out of curiosity. There is more to it. Perhaps they heard great things about the culture or feel like their current role doesn’t afford them the growth they desire and they want to know if this role might. There is always something else. That something else is usually way better than just seeing what else is out there. If I have said it once I have said it a thousand times, people buy passion. People want to feel the excitement in your voice. They want enthusiasm and if you really want to move forward in an interview process you would be wise to give it to them.

 

Saying anything offensive or inappropriate

This falls under the no brainer category. That being said, much to my shock and bewilderment, it still happens all the time. Most people spend a very short amount of their professionals lives immersed in the interview process. They occasionally interview or if they have a team, they occasionally hire someone to join it. As a recruiter, a live in it. Every day of my working life I am involved in it in some way or the other. The fact if the matter is people say things that are shocking all the time. If its political, inappropriate or in any way offensive, you need to avoid it. If you would have a hard time explaining yourself in an HR meeting or in front of your grandmother, don’t say it. If its political or religious, I would avoid saying it. You might say something and the person interviewing you agrees. For the sake of argument, let’s say 50% of the people you will ever interview with will have that same opinion. Well guess what, with that math, 50% of the time you will offend the person you are interviewing with. Do you like that math? I don’t. Now let’s circle back. Imagine the 50% of the people who agree with you. Let’s be conservative and assume that will half of them will find what you said to be poor judgement, which most reasonable people will. Given that you exhibit poor judgement they will probably opt for a different choice. That means that your comment will disqualify you 75% of the time. Guess, what, that other 25% of the time it doesn’t actually help you, it just doesn’t hurt you. If you were in a room with two doors and you had to make a choice which one you exited through and one of the doors you had a 75% chance of getting kicked by Connor McGregor and the other had a zero percent chance, which one would you chose? Also, the Connor McGregor door doesn’t add any additional benefit remember. It’s an easy choice. Well so is this, avoid saying those things and you will be much better off.

 

Well there you have it, those are my 3 absolute interview killers. If you can avoid saying them, you will be much better off. I hope you found value in that post, if you did please feel free to “like” it and share it on social media. And if you haven’t checked out last week’s post, give it a read here, When does your interview start?. Thanks for reading and have an awesome day!

When does your interview start?

I wanted to write this post in reaction to something I saw on LinkedIn the other day. A recruiter I am connected with was complaining about a candidate. Apparently this candidate had applied to her job and when she called him to set up an interview he was very rude. In the post she went on to say that for her that was all it took, she knew the candidate wasn’t going to be a fit based on the customer service qualifications necessary for the role. After I read that, it got me a thinking a little bit. Did that person actually want that job? If they did, why were they so unpleasant upon receiving the phone call?

As I was having this internal dialogue, I realized that while there are a lot of questions you can ask, perhaps the most important one is when does your interview start. Most people think it’s when you start the interview formally and the recruiter is asking you questions. In all reality, your interview starts way earlier than that. Your interview starts at first correspondence. Whether that be the very first email you respond to or the first conversation you have, setting up the formal interview, as soon as a dialogue has been established you are in the interview process.

I am sure some of you agree with me and some of you think that the interview starts when it starts. However, I can tell you that your interview starts as soon as the first impression is made. Whether that be through email correspondence or through a phone call, once you start corresponding your interview has begun. So if we are operating under that assumption let’s look at a few things you can do to make sure you aren’t sabotaging yourself early on.

Have a professional email for job application purposes

This tip is probably more for people early on in their career. I remember when I graduated college I still had my AOL email address on my resume that I created when I was 17. I wont disclose the name to avoid embarrassment but it probably wasn’t as professional as it should have been. So if you have an email address on your resume that you consider to be unfit for a resume, go to google and get yourself a Gmail account. As much as you might love Slayer, if your email address has their name in it, then it doesn’t belong on a resume. Your name with a combination of numbers should suffice.

Have a professional voicemail message

If I told you how many people had ridiculous voicemail’s while they are applying for jobs, you wouldn’t believe me. I have called candidates who applied to a role I was recruiting on just to hear heavy metal music in the background and sometimes even an inappropriate voice message. I once called a candidate and the voicemail said “Leave a message or else”. I left a message and thought to myself, “was I just threatened via voicemail recording?” If you are applying for a role, have a polite message waiting for those who call you. Simple as that.

Be polite in all communication

This is another one that should be common sense but for whatever reason, isn’t always the case. Simply put, if you are interested in finding a new job it behooves you to be polite and enthusiastic in all communications with everyone at prospective employers. If you are called to set up an interview and you communicate with all the enthusiasm of setting up a dentist appointment, you are getting on the wrong foot. If you are rude with the person setting up your interview, whether they are conducting it or not, you are getting off on the wrong foot. If you aren’t flexible in the times you are available or you push the interview out super far, you are getting off on the wrong foot. The fact of the matter is, given how competitive finding a great job is, often you can ill afford to get off on the wrong foot. Every interaction counts and if you want to be successful it is important to maximize those interactions.

So, when does your interview start? As soon as there is any form of communication. So make sure you are on your game from the get go! I hope you found this helpful. If you have any questions, please make sure to comment below and I will answer.  Also, if you haven’t already, check out last weeks post Are you prepared for a career disaster? And if you didn’t catch me on the podcast I was recently on, check it out here as well I was a guest on an awesome Podcast!

I was a guest on an awesome Podcast!

So for those of you who have read my posts and wondered to myself “I wonder what Ben sounds like”, you are in luck! I have recently started appearing on podcasts and I just wrapped up my second podcast appearance. The podcast is on the career cloud website and the podcasts are typically downloaded about 2,500 times a day. It was a really good experience and I felt like it made sense to share it with all of you. In the podcast we covered a variety of topics from interview advice, resume tips and emerging trends in hiring. It was only my second go at doing the whole podcast guest thing and I plan on doing a lot more of it in the future. So with that being said if you want to go check it out, go check the link below.

Career Cloud Podcast

So with that being said, please feel free to share this with all your social media friends. As always feel free to comment below and I hope that you find some value in this podcast. Show up, work hard and be positive. Have an awesome day!

Are you prepared for a career disaster? 5 things you need to do to be prepared.

Throughout my time in recruitment I have learned that there are many conversations you would prefer not have that you will need to have over and over again. It is just the nature of the work. Telling someone who really wanted a job that the company has decided to pass on them is never a conversation that you look forward to but if you have spent any time in recruitment you understand it is a conversation you are going to have to have many times. Another conversation I have had many times is the conversation with a person who has just been downsized. Someone, who through no fault of their own, now finds themselves without a job. You can hear the gravity of the situation the surprise and uncertainty in their voices.

As unpleasant of a reality as it may be, it is just that, a reality. Everyday companies make decisions that are entirely business motivated that adversely impact their workers. I have spoken with candidates who have worked with one company the last 20 years and now, without much warning at all, find themselves in a situation they wanted no part of. For most of those people it is quite the daunting journey to start on. Many don’t have an updated resume and besides the fact that they hate interviewing, they haven’t don’t any interviewing in years and are out of the practice.

So let me ask you this one question, are you prepared for a career disaster? Think about it, if your boss called you into her office today and let you know that your team was being eliminated from the company for whatever reason, what would you do? Do you have a plan in place? What is the first action you would take? Text a loved one? Reached out to an old colleague on LinkedIn? Find the sturdiest box to pack your things into and jet it to your car? It’s not a pleasant hypothetical. The fact of the matter is most people are not prepared. Really that’s pretty understandable, most people don’t expect it to happen. After all they work for a good company, they do good work and they have a great relationship with their boss. However, I would caution you not to kid yourself, these things can happen and regardless if those things are all true and it makes sense to be prepared just in case they do.

So let’s talk about what you can do. Regardless of the stage in your career there are steps you can take so that if the unthinkable happens you have a head start. That head start can be important too because although nobody wants to mention it, if you are part of an eliminated group, your former colleagues have just become your competition for the jobs available. So with this dreary picture painted let’s talk about the steps you should be taking now so that if push comes to shove you are ready to sprint.

  1. Have an updated resume

I have talked to many people after they get the bad news and a common theme is they don’t have an updated resume. I understand how that happens. You have a job, you aren’t looking, why have your resume updated. This scenario is the why. Periodically open up that word document and make the necessary changes so that your resume reflects your current responsibilities. That’s it. Just make sure it’s ready to go should you need it. If you want professional help getting a resume up and going check out my Resource Page for helpful links to award winning resume writers.

  1. Set up an Indeed Alert

Go to Indeed and do a search for jobs that interest you within a 20-mile radius of your home. Once you do that it will give you the option to save this search and receive emails when a job matches your criteria. You are doing this for a few reasons. The first reason is you should want to know when jobs open up that fit what you are looking for. The second takes us to our next point.

  1. Take an interview every now and then

I want to be clear, I am not advocating you waste anyone’s time but you can’t argue that it wouldn’t benefit you to see what’s out there. If you find a job that interests, you and you apply to it and end up getting an interview the outcomes are almost entirely positive. Let’s examine these outcomes. The first is you interview and end up really liking the job enough that you make a move. You wouldn’t do it if it wasn’t a better role, so that’s a positive. Now let’s say you interview and you decide the role isn’t for you. You politely thank everyone involved and remove yourself from the process as soon as you make that decision. You know what that was? It was a dress rehearsal. Now if you find yourself unemployed your next interview won’t be the first one you have done in fourteen years. Also, if you want to be good at interviewing do yourself a favor and download my FREE Interview Prep Guide. It is 100% free with no email opt-in requirements and has tons of useful knowledge, what are you waiting for? Download it!!!

  1. If a recruiter reaches out to you, have the conversation

I reach out to professionals every day to connect with them and discuss their careers and possible opportunities with them. And every single day people complete blow off my attempt and go about their lives. Don’t worry, no need for a waterproof pillow, it doesn’t hurt my feelings. I am like Kobe Bryant when he misses a shot, I completely forget about that missed shot and I take the next one. However, upon reflection I feel like it’s foolish to completely ignore or decline my attempt. For example, if that person declines my inmail or hangs up on me and a week from our interaction gets let go…wouldn’t they probably wish they had invested 5 minutes and had a courteous conversation with me? Shoot, I know I would. Take the call, you can always say no to the opportunity. Use that call to describe the roles you would have interest in hearing about and network. Build a connection as opposed to burning a bridge.

  1. Connect with old colleagues who have moved on

If you find yourself laid off its probably unlikely you return to an old employer. Sure, sometimes it happens but most of the time you left for a reason. However, some of the people you used to work with could be of great assistance if you find yourself needing a new role. If someone you used to work with gets a new job, reach out to them. LinkedIn makes it easy to stay in touch. Don’t be lazy and just click the like button though, that is generic and worthless. Send them a message, ask a few questions, strike up a dialogue. Nobody ever expresses regret to me about maintaining past relationships or being too well networked. Meet them out for a lunch or coffee. Trust me, if you ever find yourself needing to find a new role you won’t regret that you maintained good relationships.

Well there you have it. If you do the above things you can definitely say yes to the question, are you prepared for a career disaster. A few parting words, if you find yourself in this situation, stay calm and stay positive. It will be ok If you liked this post please “like” and share it with your social media friends. It’s much appreciated. Show up early, be positive, work hard and have an awesome day!