How to answer the interview question “Why are you interested in this role?”

Welcome to day two of 31 interview questions in 31 days. Yesterday we tackled the question, Why are you looking for a new role? If you missed that post, go back and check it out after this one. Today we are going to cover how to answer the question, why are you interested in this role. This might sound like an easy question to answer but people actually get it just little bit wrong all the time.

That being said, with proper preparation this is a relatively easy question to knock out of the park. At the same time, if you don’t get it right it’s one that might leave the interviewer scratching their head.

I am going to start by breaking it out down into do’s and don’ts. Make sure that you don’t speak negatively about your current employer. Trust me, your potential future manager doesn’t like hearing you speak poorly about your past manager. Don’t give a reason that seems uninspired. For example, “I don’t know, it seems similar to what I am doing now”. For those of you who are shaking your head right now thinking that isn’t a response recruiters get, I can assure you I have heard that answer hundreds of times. You can say that while your current position and this role seem similar, you feel this new role would offer you the opportunity to expand your scope or something to that effect.

Now let’s talk about a few things you should do when answering this question. Make sure that you have done enough research to comfortably speak about the things you admire about the company. Also, make sure you speak passionately. You don’t have to be over the top but people like enthusiasm. If you can put a little enthusiasm into your answer you will be much better off.

Finally, be prepared to talk about how this role would represent growth and development that is important to you in your career. These are all good reasons. When someone asks you this question, more than anything they just want to hear positive things that make sense. They want to know you are just looking for a new role for a pay bump or because you dislike your boss.

In my opinion, the perfect way to answer this question is to enthusiastically talk a little bit about why you feel the company is the kind of company you want to work for and how the role fits in with the type of development you were hoping to experience. Avoid negativity about your current company/boss as well and you will be just fine.

Hopefully you found that helpful. Tomorrow we will cover the question, what do you consider to be your biggest strength. If you have any questions you would like me to address, please comment below and I will add them to the list. If you liked this post, please feel free to share it with your social networks. Thanks for reading and remember, there is never a bad time to hear about a great opportunity.

How to answer the interview question “Why are you looking for a new role?”

This is day one of 31 interview questions in 31 days. If you are wondering what this is all about check out yesterday’s post, 31 Interview Questions in 31 Days, detailing my plan for the next month. Today we will start with a question you will be asked virtually every time you interview, why are you looking for a new role? This one is first up so let’s tackle it!

In just about every interview you ever take, you will be asked why you are looking for a new role. In every corporate interview, I have ever conducted it has been on my interview form. Every head hunting call I have ever made, if the conversation progressed, I would ask why they are interested in entertaining a new opportunity. The fact of the matter is if you ever plan on interviewing again, odds are you will need to answer this question.

So, let’s start with why. Why do recruiters and hiring manages alike ask this question? The reason is that there are good and bad ways to answer. An example of a good way to answer it is, “Well I am not actively looking, but I have always admired your company and the description for the role sounds exciting”. They might push further because the assumption is that if you are willing to leave then something must be wrong, but generally speaking, that is a good way to answer that question.

An example of a bad way to answer the questions is, “Um, I don’t know, I just wanted to see what else is out there”. That answer is bad because it doesn’t inspire confidence in your desire to ultimately take the job. From a recruiter perspective, it is just really important to know the candidate’s motivation. If they let you know they are looking for a new role because they don’t see any realistic way to move up within their current organization, it’s something you want to emphasize your company having, assuming that’s the case. Also, if you ever find that candidate accepting your offer and then receiving a counter offer, it’s important to be able to remind them exactly why they were looking in the first place. Does that counter offer you were just extended solve your original reasons for looking for employment elsewhere?

So, let’s talk about answering this question. Let’s assume you are already employed, because if you are unemployed then answering this question is much more straight forward, you are looking for a new job. So, start by establishing leverage, “I am actually not really looking, I am quite happy where I currently am, I just so happen to stumble upon this position and it really intrigued me”. By answering the question in this manner, you let them know that you aren’t desperate, you would be perfectly fine going back to your current job if this doesn’t work out and that if they really want you they are going to have to bring it.

There is a possibility they will push further and try to get a deeper answer. They might say something like, “well sure but there must be some reason why you are entertaining other opportunities”. I like responding to that question by saying something along the lines of while you really enjoy your current role, you don’t see a lot of future growth, development opportunities or ways for you to expand the scope of your work. This gives them the additional “why” they are looking for while also positioning you as someone who seeks development.

You must avoid sounding like you don’t care about this role and are doing it for kicks. That is the wrong way to establish leverage. You also must avoid saying negative things about your current employer. They may all be true but you will come off as difficult to work with. There you have it. If you do those things you will have done a great job answering that question. Tomorrow we will tackle the question likely to come up next, “why are you interested in this role?” So, come back and find out the secret to answering that question. Thanks for reading and remember, there is never a bad time to hear about a great opportunity!

31 Interview Questions in 31 Days

I going to do something drastically different. For the last year, I have run this blog and for the most part I would create one post per week. Typically, they range from 1100 to 1500 hundred words. And frankly, it has actually gone quite well. I have received significant traffic, people have purchased My eBook, people have downloaded my FREE Interview Prep Guide and I have even been asked to be on a few podcasts. So why change it? Well my plan is to change it for one month only. For the next 31 days, I plan on posting a post every single day.

Now, I don’t plan on posting 1400 word posts. That would be a ton of writing. I plan on creating 31 quick hitting posts. Each of these posts will be designed to help my audience answer one interview question. Of all the questions, I get asked, the greatest majority of those question are how to answer specific interview questions. How do I answer “why are you looking for a new job”? How do I answer “what are you targeting in terms of compensation”? You get the point.

For the next 31 days I will attack an interview question. I will tell you why the question gets asked, what the recruiter will be looking for and how you can answer the question to the best of your ability. At the end of the 31 days I plan on returning to my normal format. However, in the meantime I hope this flood of content can help you prepare for 2017. Because while we have hit the slow months in terms of recruiting, it will be 2017 before you know it and those of you who are interested in pursuing new career opportunities will need to get going quick.

So, I hope you enjoy. If you have any questions you specifically want me to ask feel free to comment below. If you happen to see this post on LinkedIn, please feel free to comment below. That is usually the easiest way for me to see it. Well that is all I had. Tomorrow come back to the blog to see me answer the question, “Why are you looking for a new role”? Thanks for reading and remember, there is never a bad time to hear about a great opportunity!

Remarkably Easy and Effective Networking Advice

Today is my birthday. I had another topic in mind but the occasion has forced my hand and today I want to talk a little bit about networking. A little over a month ago I wrote this post, Are you prepared for a career disaster?. It dealt with the situation of being laid off and your level of preparedness. Now, a big portion of that is networking. Who you know is often just as valuable as what you know or how well you interview. So what does career disasters and my birthday have in common? LinkedIn. In an attempt to have a robust profile I have filled out every available line. I have a picture, a link to this blog, every job I have had in my professional career, my degree and yes, my birthday. Starting last night around 7pm I started receiving emails from LinkedIn, notifying me that people were sending me messages.

Now this is entirely out of the ordinary, I am a recruiter after all. However, the frequency at which I am receiving these emails and the well wishes make it obvious, it is in fact well wishes for my birthday. Another thing is very obvious to me as well, I am going to receive a lot of these. Being a recruiter as well as a blogger, social media is very important to me. As such, I have built a decently large network. I have just under 9,000 first degree connections on LinkedIn and another 4,200 hundred followers on twitter. While I don’t expect too much in terms of birthday wishes from twitter, my expectation is a steady stream of messages filling my inbox all day through LinkedIn.

Now, I happen to love LinkedIn. It’s a great way to connect, learn about new topics and share information. One of the many great things LinkedIn does is it literally holds your hand through a variety of human interactions. What I mean by that is look at the top right portion of your screen on the LinkedIn homepage. There are 15 reminders up there every single day. They remind you when it is someone’s birthday or when they have an anniversary at an employer or when they switch jobs.

reminder

I once listened to a speaker talk about relationship building. In this talk, the speaker said that every morning he would open the paper and look in a section that chronicled local people’s promotions, new jobs and career moves. He would look for the people he knew and he would write each of them a hand written letter of congratulations regarding the significant career event. Three things came to mind when as I listened to this speech. The first was, wow, what a kind gesture that also happens to seem like a pretty smart idea. The second was, man, that seems like a ton of work. The third was, what is a newspaper? Just kidding, but seriously, in a vacuum, what a wonderful concept.

Now the downside to that plan is that it would be a ton of work. Enter LinkedIn. Because LinkedIn gives you reminders every single day about the happening s in your network and provides you several links that enable various forms of action, almost all of the work has been taken out of it. So if you look at this section in the top right hand corner it shows you a few things. It tells you the person and what has happened with them. It also gives you three options, like, message or skip. Now, technically “liking” there update is better than doing nothing, “skip”. But it isn’t much better. Almost everyone who happens to be on LinkedIn on that given day will hit like.

But what if you did more than that? What if every time you noticed someone received a promotion or a new job or the earth had a rotated around the sun another time, all the while they were employed with their current company, you messaged them? What if you wrote them a quick but personalized message, letting them know you are aware of the events in their life and wish them well? If you click “message”, LinkedIn will provide with a generic message like “congrats” or “happy birthday”, whatever they deem appropriate for the situation. And to be clear, nothing is wrong with that. In fact, it is still a pretty nice gesture. But how much effort would it take for you to write them a small note saying you are happy to see the progress in their career and perhaps recalling something you remember about them?

The fact of the matter is it will take very little work and you will make an impact. Messages like this might lead to conversations and those conversations could lead to meeting up with lunch with an old colleague. LinkedIn isn’t just a place where you can post pictures and opinions that really are more appropriate for Facebook, it’s a catalyst for maintaining and building professional relationships.

So here is my call to action. For a month, log into LinkedIn every day. Once there send a message to every person that LinkedIn brings up in that top right corner. My guess is it will take you less than 5 minutes. Do this and see what happens. The fact of the matter is its employees who are referred to an open position get the job at a much higher percentage than those of us who go through the traditional application process. Today’s workforce can be very volatile. In the time I have spent in Talent Acquisition I have had more talks than I care to remember with people who unexpectedly found themselves out of a job. I have heard those people say a lot of the same things. I didn’t see this coming. What should I do now? I haven’t had to interview is so long. I need to update my resume. However, I have never had someone say to me, I wish I was less well networked.

So try it. Send those messages. Strike up a dialogue with a former colleague. Cultivate relationships. Even if you never find yourself in the position where you find yourself needing to find a new job, there are plenty of benefits to having solid relationships. If nothing else, it’s a nice thing to do and you could make someone’s day. If you liked this post, please “like” and share it with your social media! Thanks for reading and remember, there is never a bad time to hear about a good opportunity.

What Most Companies Mess Up About The Interview Process

When I receive an email from a candidate following an interview when I wasn’t expecting an email, I don’t even need to open it. I already know what it says. Well I mean, I don’t know every word but I know what the main takeaway is going to be. My candidate it regretfully informing me that they are dropping out of the process or that they have accepted another offer. You see, when things are going great, people usually aren’t calling me. If the interview went amazing, I am going to have to make the calls if I want to get that information. As someone who has been recruiting non-stop for the last seven years I have received a ton of those emails.

Usually they are pretty much the same. They are polite, they are thoughtful and there is a visible effort to try and let me down easy. Do you want to know a secret? I’m rarely ever upset at the candidate. The only way I am ever upset at the candidate is if they misrepresented something along the way or the timing is painfully bad. But, if they realized the opportunity wasn’t a great fit for them or they had a bad experience interviewing, what reasonable person could be mad about that. Not me.

In fact, I am more likely to be irritated with the people who had been doing the interviewing. When a candidate tells me that they had a bad experience interviewing or that perhaps that didn’t quite get the “vibe” they were hoping for, I am disappointed for all involved. Because usually that means the hiring company didn’t make the interview enough about the candidate. It usually means they were so laser focused on figuring out if this was the right person or not that they didn’t take the time to show the candidate why the company was right for them.

People who are involved in hiring typically operate under the belief that there are two types of candidate markets. They think that when there aren’t a lot of jobs and perhaps the economy isn’t doing so hot, it’s a company driven market. Meaning that there are many people looking for jobs and few jobs available. Or the other end of that, when the economy is doing great and there are a lot of available jobs, it is a candidate driven market. Now for many years I also believed that but I was wrong. The fact of the matter is, a scarcity will always exist when it comes to the talent that is capable of making an impact that is extraordinary. No matter what is going on in the market, the top 25% of the talent in the workforce will be gainfully employed as long as it is their desire to do so.

So what does that mean for those of us who are trying to find and hire these transformative individuals? It means if you ever stop selling the opportunity, you are failing to put yourself in the best possible position to succeed as an organization. So, to answer the question I posed in the title, most companies misdiagnose the dynamic created when you are trying to make a hire. They are under the impression that the only party that needs to be sold is them. That couldn’t be further from the truth. If you really want to be able to hire the type of people who will transform your fortunes as an organization, you need to interview with the mindset that selling what you have to offer is absolutely as critical as making sure they are the right person.

Now, I will get into that in a minute, I am going to take you on a small diversion to give you a little bit of information on my personal recruitment. If you haven’t been to the About Me section of my page, I work for a company called Titus Talent. I could go on and on about how we are not your typical recruitment firm. For our clients, what really matters is we are much more so partners than you typical staffing firm and that we save them 70% on traditional recruiting firms. In fact, recently I filled a Project Leader role for a client and when it was all said and done it cost them less than five thousand dollars. If they had worked with me while I was at Manpower it would have cost them just under twenty-eight thousand dollars. So besides the fact that we provide comprehensive activity reports, massive amount of savings and a database of all the candidates we reached out to that they can pull from in the future, every single candidate we submit is a passive candidate (by the way, if you have ever worked with a third party recruiter before, the past couple of sentences should be earth shattering. If you want to learn more about our process and how we might help your company find the best talent at a fraction of the cost, email me at ben.white@titustalent.com and I will be happy to tell you all about it and answer your questions).

So, when I say that every candidate is passive, this is what I mean. Every single candidate we submit is someone we reached out to, virtually none of our candidates every apply to a posting of ours. That is of course because these postings don’t exist. My company never posts a job. When I was at Manpower, a client would give us a role and I would then post it online to a plethora of job boards and sometimes, one of those candidates would be the ones who got the job. So my client would pay us 20% of the candidates first year salary for a candidate who applied to a posting. Not here, every candidate we present is someone who we went out and found. Truly passive, transformational talent.

Now let’s circle back. Imagine you did all the work to engage top 15% in the market talent and even though they were happy with their current role and not looking to interview, you got them interested and they decided to interview for an opportunity. Now imagine the client is super interested as well, they decide to have this person onsite for an interview. Now finally imagine the candidate says she found the interview process to be intimidating and isn’t interested and wants to stay where she is because after all, she wasn’t looking and is happy where she is at. Now also imagine the client calls you and says, “Ben, that candidate is Great! She has all the technical skills and would fit in great here!” It is now your job to tell them the candidate has removed herself from the process and has no interest in moving forward.

Guess what, that can happen if companies fail to do their part in selling the opportunity. Last week I wrote a post on panel interviews, The Truth About Panel Interviews – And how you can beat them! Intimidating panel interviews are a component of why a candidate might get pushed away but they are by no means the only reason. My advice to companies is make sure you remember that selling the opportunity is just as important as figuring out if the candidate is the right one. The fact of the matter is you will be able to determine if the candidate is the right one or not when you interview them whether or not you sell the opportunity or not. If you believe that, then why wouldn’t you sell what you have to offer. Tell them why people like working here, show them around and remember that they are people too who like to be treated kindly. If you can find a way to turn your interview experience into an experience where you are truly able to sell this opportunity you will be putting yourself at a significant competitive advantage. Remember, there will always be a shortage of the best people, regardless of the market.

Well there you have it! What most companies mess up about the interview process is they remember to find out if you are right for them but they forget to demonstrate why they are right for you. If you liked this post, share it! I love seeing when people share my posts in their LinkedIn groups or on Facebook. Also, please feel free to share your thoughts below, I always try and comment back. What I would love to hear is examples of when companies did an awesome job of selling you on their opportunity. You can also share horror stories of interviews you have been on; those could be really fun to share as well. Thanks for reading and remember, there is never a bad time to hear about an amazing opportunity!

The Truth About Panel Interviews – And how you can beat them!

I am going to start this post by saying I do not like panel interviews and I am in no way shape or form in favor of them. In fact, if you were to ask most people what their least favorite part of interviewing was, I am willing to bet at least half the people you ask would say panel interviewing. So, why do people hate them so much? What is it about panel interviews that makes people single them out as such a negative experience? Well, a few years back I ended up calling a bunch of candidates who had turned down attractive offers over the last 6 months. I called to ask them about their experiences in order to get some candid feedback from people who had been involved in our process.

The feedback I got was that the interviews where cold, it felt as if they were being grilled, they didn’t do a good enough job of selling the opportunity and that they absolutely hated the panel interviews. People hate them because they are the most nerve-wracking component of an already stressful event. Interviewing is already something a lot of people don’t like doing, but this is the worst part in many people’s eyes.

So you might be asking, well Ben, if this is the case why do people do panel interviews. Preach! I agree, we should do away with them. However, as uncomfortable as they may be, the fact of the matter is that there is value there for the company doing the interviewing. For one, they can get the candidate in front of a lot of people in a limited amount of time. In addition to that they get to see how the person might react to a stressful situation and they get a sense of how this person is able to handle themselves in a complicated group setting. There is no denying, getting an idea of how a candidate handles a stressful situation and being able to see how they communicate in that situation has value.

So far we have established two things. The first is that generally speaking people dislike panel interviews and that they aren’t going anywhere. So, if they aren’t going anywhere, you should probably get better at doing them right? Right! I recently had a panel interview and it went pretty well I think. It didn’t go terribly at least because I got the job and here I am now. So let’s talk about what I did to do well enough that I wasn’t derailed by that panel interview.

How to beat Panel Interviews

So I am going to give you three tips that will help you with panel interviews. I can’t help that they will always work, to some degree it will always depend on the interviewers but these should help. If you can employ these three techniques, most of the panel interviews you will do for the rest of your life will go well. Oh, and for extra help, check out this 5 Things Smart Interviewers Do in the Lobby.

Be confident

The first thing you need to do is not let nerves get to you. I know that is easier said than done. However, if you seem stressed they will notice and you aren’t doing yourself any favors. To be confident, you need to be prepared. So, do your research and go into the interviewer knowing that there is nothing more you could have done to position yourself for success. Once there, sit up straight, smile, look them in the eye and know that they also put their pants on one leg at a time just like you. A lot of it comes down to mindset. Push the fear out of your mind, be confident in what you bring to the table (if it wasn’t a lot, you wouldn’t be there) and let the passion for what you do show!

Don’t worry, be happy! And Passionate!

This one is another attitude adjustment. Your attitude can be infectious. If you smile, are happy and it’s obvious that you love what you do you can completely change the feeling in the room. Don’t think of it as an interview, think of it as a conversation with people who do what you do. However, some of the most frequent feedback I hear from panel interviews is the person lacked energy or passion. Don’t let that be you! I always advocate preparation, passion and positivity in interviewing. This is no different, it might even be more important in this setting.

Allocate your attention evenly

This is the single biggest pitfall people fall victim to while doing panel interviews. I have heard so many times that the interviewer completely ignored a person or directed all their attention to the person with the highest role. That is disrespectful and stupid. People notice when you do that and the person you ignored won’t be the only person who considers it in ill taste. When someone asks you a question, look at them but also make note to look at everyone a little bit. Look them in the eye, answer confidently and make sure you spend an equal amount of time engaging everyone there. I have seen this derail many candidates and it can be the kiss of death for an interview and your potential candidacy. Everyone took time to be there and prepare. Make sure you show them the respect they deserve and connect with them.

Well there you have it! If you can do those three things you will be ok. So much of success is showing up early, respecting people and being positive. The same holds true for interviews. For more prep advice, get my FREE Interview Prep Guide. If you liked this post and I hope you did, please share it and like it on your social networks. Go after what you want today, it’s the best way to live. Have an awesome day and thanks for reading!

3 Absolute Interview Killers – Avoid saying these at all costs

In the past I have written posts about things you shouldn’t say, things you should say and ways to phrase certain things. However, after some recent feedback on an interview I felt it made sense to share this post on things you absolutely have to avoid saying. These are things where if you say them, you will absolutely not be getting that job. Now, I will say this is of course subject to the Welding Engineer exception. If you have read any of my posts in the past I have referred to the fact that some of the standard rules may not apply to people who happen to have a really rare skill set, like Welding Engineers. Bit for the rest of us, like you and me, if we say these things in the middle of an interview, you might as well save everyone’s time by picking up your stuff and going home. So with that being said let’s look at the things you must avoid saying at all cost if you want to be successful in your interview.

My last job/boss was terrible!

Most of us have had several bosses or jobs that were terrible. Maybe the culture was toxic or perhaps there was no work life balance. This happens. It’s out there and if you have avoided these situations, that is awesome. However, most working adults have situations we look back not so fondly on. However, if at any point in your interview you mention that your prior boss sucked you aren’t getting that job. That’s pretty black and white and yes, perhaps there are instances where you will get the job. However, you just put yourself at a disadvantage, unnecessarily I might add. If you were going to run a marathon, would you want to eat a bunch of McDonalds right before the race began? Of course not. Could you still end up finishing? Yea, of course. But is it a smart idea? Of course it isn’t. Be positive and take the high road for your own good.

 

I decided to take this interview just to see what’s out there

I want to start by saying that obviously this one isn’t as bad as the first. However, you still need to avoid saying it.  Imagine you go on a date and the person you are out with says something along the lines of “the only reason I am here is to see what’s on the menu at this restaurant”. How excited are you about that response? Might you have taken the interview out of curiosity? Sure. However, that goes under the category things you may actually feel but make no sense for you to disclose. That answer benefits no one. And quite frankly, it’s not true. Nobody goes on an interview solely out of curiosity. There is more to it. Perhaps they heard great things about the culture or feel like their current role doesn’t afford them the growth they desire and they want to know if this role might. There is always something else. That something else is usually way better than just seeing what else is out there. If I have said it once I have said it a thousand times, people buy passion. People want to feel the excitement in your voice. They want enthusiasm and if you really want to move forward in an interview process you would be wise to give it to them.

 

Saying anything offensive or inappropriate

This falls under the no brainer category. That being said, much to my shock and bewilderment, it still happens all the time. Most people spend a very short amount of their professionals lives immersed in the interview process. They occasionally interview or if they have a team, they occasionally hire someone to join it. As a recruiter, a live in it. Every day of my working life I am involved in it in some way or the other. The fact if the matter is people say things that are shocking all the time. If its political, inappropriate or in any way offensive, you need to avoid it. If you would have a hard time explaining yourself in an HR meeting or in front of your grandmother, don’t say it. If its political or religious, I would avoid saying it. You might say something and the person interviewing you agrees. For the sake of argument, let’s say 50% of the people you will ever interview with will have that same opinion. Well guess what, with that math, 50% of the time you will offend the person you are interviewing with. Do you like that math? I don’t. Now let’s circle back. Imagine the 50% of the people who agree with you. Let’s be conservative and assume that will half of them will find what you said to be poor judgement, which most reasonable people will. Given that you exhibit poor judgement they will probably opt for a different choice. That means that your comment will disqualify you 75% of the time. Guess, what, that other 25% of the time it doesn’t actually help you, it just doesn’t hurt you. If you were in a room with two doors and you had to make a choice which one you exited through and one of the doors you had a 75% chance of getting kicked by Connor McGregor and the other had a zero percent chance, which one would you chose? Also, the Connor McGregor door doesn’t add any additional benefit remember. It’s an easy choice. Well so is this, avoid saying those things and you will be much better off.

 

Well there you have it, those are my 3 absolute interview killers. If you can avoid saying them, you will be much better off. I hope you found value in that post, if you did please feel free to “like” it and share it on social media. And if you haven’t checked out last week’s post, give it a read here, When does your interview start?. Thanks for reading and have an awesome day!

When does your interview start?

I wanted to write this post in reaction to something I saw on LinkedIn the other day. A recruiter I am connected with was complaining about a candidate. Apparently this candidate had applied to her job and when she called him to set up an interview he was very rude. In the post she went on to say that for her that was all it took, she knew the candidate wasn’t going to be a fit based on the customer service qualifications necessary for the role. After I read that, it got me a thinking a little bit. Did that person actually want that job? If they did, why were they so unpleasant upon receiving the phone call?

As I was having this internal dialogue, I realized that while there are a lot of questions you can ask, perhaps the most important one is when does your interview start. Most people think it’s when you start the interview formally and the recruiter is asking you questions. In all reality, your interview starts way earlier than that. Your interview starts at first correspondence. Whether that be the very first email you respond to or the first conversation you have, setting up the formal interview, as soon as a dialogue has been established you are in the interview process.

I am sure some of you agree with me and some of you think that the interview starts when it starts. However, I can tell you that your interview starts as soon as the first impression is made. Whether that be through email correspondence or through a phone call, once you start corresponding your interview has begun. So if we are operating under that assumption let’s look at a few things you can do to make sure you aren’t sabotaging yourself early on.

Have a professional email for job application purposes

This tip is probably more for people early on in their career. I remember when I graduated college I still had my AOL email address on my resume that I created when I was 17. I wont disclose the name to avoid embarrassment but it probably wasn’t as professional as it should have been. So if you have an email address on your resume that you consider to be unfit for a resume, go to google and get yourself a Gmail account. As much as you might love Slayer, if your email address has their name in it, then it doesn’t belong on a resume. Your name with a combination of numbers should suffice.

Have a professional voicemail message

If I told you how many people had ridiculous voicemail’s while they are applying for jobs, you wouldn’t believe me. I have called candidates who applied to a role I was recruiting on just to hear heavy metal music in the background and sometimes even an inappropriate voice message. I once called a candidate and the voicemail said “Leave a message or else”. I left a message and thought to myself, “was I just threatened via voicemail recording?” If you are applying for a role, have a polite message waiting for those who call you. Simple as that.

Be polite in all communication

This is another one that should be common sense but for whatever reason, isn’t always the case. Simply put, if you are interested in finding a new job it behooves you to be polite and enthusiastic in all communications with everyone at prospective employers. If you are called to set up an interview and you communicate with all the enthusiasm of setting up a dentist appointment, you are getting on the wrong foot. If you are rude with the person setting up your interview, whether they are conducting it or not, you are getting off on the wrong foot. If you aren’t flexible in the times you are available or you push the interview out super far, you are getting off on the wrong foot. The fact of the matter is, given how competitive finding a great job is, often you can ill afford to get off on the wrong foot. Every interaction counts and if you want to be successful it is important to maximize those interactions.

So, when does your interview start? As soon as there is any form of communication. So make sure you are on your game from the get go! I hope you found this helpful. If you have any questions, please make sure to comment below and I will answer.  Also, if you haven’t already, check out last weeks post Are you prepared for a career disaster? And if you didn’t catch me on the podcast I was recently on, check it out here as well I was a guest on an awesome Podcast!

I was a guest on an awesome Podcast!

So for those of you who have read my posts and wondered to myself “I wonder what Ben sounds like”, you are in luck! I have recently started appearing on podcasts and I just wrapped up my second podcast appearance. The podcast is on the career cloud website and the podcasts are typically downloaded about 2,500 times a day. It was a really good experience and I felt like it made sense to share it with all of you. In the podcast we covered a variety of topics from interview advice, resume tips and emerging trends in hiring. It was only my second go at doing the whole podcast guest thing and I plan on doing a lot more of it in the future. So with that being said if you want to go check it out, go check the link below.

Career Cloud Podcast

So with that being said, please feel free to share this with all your social media friends. As always feel free to comment below and I hope that you find some value in this podcast. Show up, work hard and be positive. Have an awesome day!

Are you prepared for a career disaster? 5 things you need to do to be prepared.

Throughout my time in recruitment I have learned that there are many conversations you would prefer not have that you will need to have over and over again. It is just the nature of the work. Telling someone who really wanted a job that the company has decided to pass on them is never a conversation that you look forward to but if you have spent any time in recruitment you understand it is a conversation you are going to have to have many times. Another conversation I have had many times is the conversation with a person who has just been downsized. Someone, who through no fault of their own, now finds themselves without a job. You can hear the gravity of the situation the surprise and uncertainty in their voices.

As unpleasant of a reality as it may be, it is just that, a reality. Everyday companies make decisions that are entirely business motivated that adversely impact their workers. I have spoken with candidates who have worked with one company the last 20 years and now, without much warning at all, find themselves in a situation they wanted no part of. For most of those people it is quite the daunting journey to start on. Many don’t have an updated resume and besides the fact that they hate interviewing, they haven’t don’t any interviewing in years and are out of the practice.

So let me ask you this one question, are you prepared for a career disaster? Think about it, if your boss called you into her office today and let you know that your team was being eliminated from the company for whatever reason, what would you do? Do you have a plan in place? What is the first action you would take? Text a loved one? Reached out to an old colleague on LinkedIn? Find the sturdiest box to pack your things into and jet it to your car? It’s not a pleasant hypothetical. The fact of the matter is most people are not prepared. Really that’s pretty understandable, most people don’t expect it to happen. After all they work for a good company, they do good work and they have a great relationship with their boss. However, I would caution you not to kid yourself, these things can happen and regardless if those things are all true and it makes sense to be prepared just in case they do.

So let’s talk about what you can do. Regardless of the stage in your career there are steps you can take so that if the unthinkable happens you have a head start. That head start can be important too because although nobody wants to mention it, if you are part of an eliminated group, your former colleagues have just become your competition for the jobs available. So with this dreary picture painted let’s talk about the steps you should be taking now so that if push comes to shove you are ready to sprint.

  1. Have an updated resume

I have talked to many people after they get the bad news and a common theme is they don’t have an updated resume. I understand how that happens. You have a job, you aren’t looking, why have your resume updated. This scenario is the why. Periodically open up that word document and make the necessary changes so that your resume reflects your current responsibilities. That’s it. Just make sure it’s ready to go should you need it. If you want professional help getting a resume up and going check out my Resource Page for helpful links to award winning resume writers.

  1. Set up an Indeed Alert

Go to Indeed and do a search for jobs that interest you within a 20-mile radius of your home. Once you do that it will give you the option to save this search and receive emails when a job matches your criteria. You are doing this for a few reasons. The first reason is you should want to know when jobs open up that fit what you are looking for. The second takes us to our next point.

  1. Take an interview every now and then

I want to be clear, I am not advocating you waste anyone’s time but you can’t argue that it wouldn’t benefit you to see what’s out there. If you find a job that interests, you and you apply to it and end up getting an interview the outcomes are almost entirely positive. Let’s examine these outcomes. The first is you interview and end up really liking the job enough that you make a move. You wouldn’t do it if it wasn’t a better role, so that’s a positive. Now let’s say you interview and you decide the role isn’t for you. You politely thank everyone involved and remove yourself from the process as soon as you make that decision. You know what that was? It was a dress rehearsal. Now if you find yourself unemployed your next interview won’t be the first one you have done in fourteen years. Also, if you want to be good at interviewing do yourself a favor and download my FREE Interview Prep Guide. It is 100% free with no email opt-in requirements and has tons of useful knowledge, what are you waiting for? Download it!!!

  1. If a recruiter reaches out to you, have the conversation

I reach out to professionals every day to connect with them and discuss their careers and possible opportunities with them. And every single day people complete blow off my attempt and go about their lives. Don’t worry, no need for a waterproof pillow, it doesn’t hurt my feelings. I am like Kobe Bryant when he misses a shot, I completely forget about that missed shot and I take the next one. However, upon reflection I feel like it’s foolish to completely ignore or decline my attempt. For example, if that person declines my inmail or hangs up on me and a week from our interaction gets let go…wouldn’t they probably wish they had invested 5 minutes and had a courteous conversation with me? Shoot, I know I would. Take the call, you can always say no to the opportunity. Use that call to describe the roles you would have interest in hearing about and network. Build a connection as opposed to burning a bridge.

  1. Connect with old colleagues who have moved on

If you find yourself laid off its probably unlikely you return to an old employer. Sure, sometimes it happens but most of the time you left for a reason. However, some of the people you used to work with could be of great assistance if you find yourself needing a new role. If someone you used to work with gets a new job, reach out to them. LinkedIn makes it easy to stay in touch. Don’t be lazy and just click the like button though, that is generic and worthless. Send them a message, ask a few questions, strike up a dialogue. Nobody ever expresses regret to me about maintaining past relationships or being too well networked. Meet them out for a lunch or coffee. Trust me, if you ever find yourself needing to find a new role you won’t regret that you maintained good relationships.

Well there you have it. If you do the above things you can definitely say yes to the question, are you prepared for a career disaster. A few parting words, if you find yourself in this situation, stay calm and stay positive. It will be ok If you liked this post please “like” and share it with your social media friends. It’s much appreciated. Show up early, be positive, work hard and have an awesome day!