If You Want a Recruiter to Delete Your Message, Do This!

How many of you start out writing an email hoping that the content is completely ignored? I imagine that since you have arrived on my site, the answer to that question is that none of you actually want that. Let’s be more specific, how many of you reach out to a recruiter, hoping that he or she will delete your message without reading it? I’m going to wager a guess that once again, none of you have that as the desired outcome of writing a message. At this point I imagine some of you are thinking, “Ben, you are now four sentences into this post, where are you going with this?”

Fair, let’s get to the point. I am writing this post because I see people write messages every day that I know will be deleted. I also receive messages from people at least once a week that are wildly ineffective and that, simply put are not accomplishing what they were created to do. In fact, I am going to say that this method is the least effective way to contact a recruiter if the end goal is a job, an interview or a relationship. I am going to tell you what this method is now so that you can avoid doing this for the rest of your professional career.

Ok so let’s get to the message. Now, this message can come in many forms. Sometimes it’s an email, sometimes it’s a message on LinkedIn and sometimes it’s even a reply to a post. However, the one thing they will all have in common is that they will soon be ignored or deleted. Let’s take a look at what this might actually look like. Usually it reads something like the following:

 

“Hi Ben. My name is Katie. I am a Mechanical Engineer who graduated from Sterling University. I am looking for a new role, if you have anything suitable please advise.”

 

Do you hear that sound? That is the sound of Recruiters everywhere clapping and yelling “Preach”. I cannot begin to tell you how ineffective that message is. Whatever the goal of that message was, it will not be accomplished. Now some of you might be thinking “Ben, what is wrong with that message? I thought you were a recruiter….recruit!” Well the first thing that comes to mind is that this person did absolutely no research. In fact, besides saying nothing at all this is literally the least amount of effort someone could put in to try and achieve their end goal of employment.

The caveat here is that you happen to have a skill that is such a rare commodity and I happen to be looking for someone with that skill, then that might work. However, if you aren’t a welding engineer or a penetration tester or a paint coatings scientist or a Senior Crystal Growth Scientist (I have filled all four of those roles by the way) then you are probably out of luck. The above message will not resonate with good recruiters. It shows lack of effort when it comes to research and it comes off as lazy.

Now for those of you saying “well Ben, I get tons of messages from recruiters and they are lazy as well and they don’t do the necessary research either!” you aren’t wrong. That is true. It would be impossible for me to defend the actions of all recruiters out there. However, the goal of this post is so help you recognize what not to do and spend the extra five minutes to make your outreach attempt 100x more successful.

Now I most frequently get this message on LinkedIn. So that means someone requested to connect with me or already was connected to me. Which means before they sent that message they had the ability to view my profile. Which means they can see where I work and with just a little bit of leg work they themselves are capable of seeing some of the jobs my company is looking to fill. Now if the recruiter happens to be a headhunter, you may not have access to their jobs making this more difficult but if they are a Corporate Recruiter, this really is quite easy. Now let’s look at an example of a really effective message.

 

“Hi Ben. Thanks for accepting my request to connect. I see that you work for ABC Company. I have been hearing a lot about your company in the news recently and have always respected your company’s products. I was on the website and noticed you currently have a posting for a Mechanical Engineer. After reading the description, not only does it sound really interesting but I strongly believe I meet the requirements. The posting says it requires 4 years of experience, a strong knowledge of metal fabrications and a strong proficiency with solidworks. I have 5 years’ experience, I have over 2,000 hours working with solidworks and a strong background in metal fab. This position seems like it could potentially be a fit. I would love to talk with you more about the role, when would you have a few minutes to chat? You can reach me at 123-456-7899 between the hours of 12-1pm or 3-6pm. Thanks again and I look forward to hearing from you!”

 

Do you see the difference? For me the difference is I am responding to the second one. They showed initiative, were polite and from the looks of it, are qualified. The message will take a little bit longer to write but if you care at all about the success rate of the emails you write, I would advise you to go with option two. Hopefully this helps and I appreciate you taking the time to read it. If you have a few more minutes go check out this post, The Difference Between Great Interviewers and Good Interviewers, it’s one of my favorite posts I’ve written over the last six months! If you found some value in this post, please share with your social networks. Thanks and have an awesome day!

3 Reasons You Aren’t Getting Interviews – Things in Your Control

Last week I wrote a post about the some of the reasons you might not be getting called to do interviews. After all, you are totally qualified, presentable and generally speaking, pleasant to be around, you should be beating recruiters off with a stick. So when you aren’t, I know that it can be pretty frustrating. Last week’s post was about things that are out of your control. (If you haven’t read it yet, give it a read here, 3 Reasons Why You Aren’t Getting Interviews – Things that are out of your control) However, this week I want to focus on things that are well within your control. It’s one thing to be adversely impacted by things you can’t change, that’s an unfortunate reality in certain situations. But in those situations where its within your power to alter your circumstances, you owe it to yourself to do it. The below situations are all things you can change now that will immediately impact your job search.  Also, make sure you read the entirety of the 3rd tip, most people don’t know the impact it has on the way they are viewed.

 

Your resume looks terrible

Let’s start with the low hanging fruit. There is no excuse for having a bad looking resume. There are literally hundreds of sites where you can go and find templates. In fact, check out my Resource Page, there are a few links there to resume services. Now, if you want someone to help you there, then there is a charge. However they also have resume templates you can copy….for free. Literally, they are free, there is no reason not to have an awesome looking resume. However, even with the wealth of free resources out there at the fingertips of job seekers everywhere, time and time again I see resumes that just look bad.  Let me explain to you why this is such a big deal by explaining to you at a high level what life is like for a corporate recruiter. Most corporate recruiters I know (and myself when I was one) have like 20 to 40 positions they are responsible for recruiting on. A lot of that is just opening the req, looking at applicants and sending the best ones to the hiring manager for their review. So, knowing that, if you are one of let’s say 45 applicants who all happen to be similarly qualified and your resume is terrible to look at, how likely do you think your chances of being moved forward are? Exactly, next!

 

You have an objective that you don’t change

I have always been of the opinion that the best objective on the resume is one that doesn’t exist. I have pretty much always been an outspoken advocate of dropping the objective from your resume. In fact, I reference it in both my My eBook and my FREE Interview Prep Guide. I think they are a waste of space and occasionally harmful and here’s why. As a recruiter, if you applied to my job, I know you are interested in it. You literally demonstrated that you want the job by going through what is frequently an unpleasant process and applying. You created an account, a fancy password, answered a bunch of questions and finally hit submit. If you didn’t want the job you wouldn’t do that. So when I see “my objective is to get a mechanical engineering role at ABC Company” it is redundant. I don’t ever look at that and say to myself “oh, thank god, she wants the job….I thought she was just applying to kill time”. The bottom line is you do not benefit from having an objective. If google wouldn’t punish me for the redundancy I would type that sentence out again. So we have established that they can’t help you, let’s talk about how they can hurt you. It’s simple, people don’t always change them. I have had people say they were looking for a job that’s different from the one they applied to and at a different company. So if I send your resume to my hiring manager and they see that, what do you think they are going to think? Worst case scenario, they don’t actually want my job, delete! Best case scenario they think you are lazy or have low attention to detail. There is no positive outcome here. So in summary, doesn’t help you can potentially hurt you. I rest my case.

 

You aren’t customizing your resume for the job you want

If you aren’t customizing your resume to mirror some of the responsibilities of the role (in a truthful manner, don’t say you have done something if you can’t) then you don’t realize its benefits or you are just lazy. And since I am about to tell you the benefits, if you don’t do it moving forward then the only option left is that you are being lazy and you are better than that. So modifying your resume helps you in two critical ways, one obvious and one not so obvious. The obvious one is that anyone looking at your resume will see that you have the experience that makes you a fit based on what they have said they are looking for. That is obviously a very good thing. The second way is not so obvious but almost just as important. When you apply to a role, in most cases your resume is store in an applicant tracking system. You are put into a folder with others who apply to the role. Now this is why it’s so important to try and mirror the job description if you happen to have the qualifications they look for. Most applicant tracking systems use some sort of algorithm to match the resumes of the applicants to the job description. Think about that for a minute. Now imagine you are a recruiter with a finite amount of time and a lot of work. You open up a folder looking for a few good candidates to send to your manager. Your fancy ATS shows you that you have forty applicants you haven’t looked at yet. It gives you a percentage of how well each candidates resume matches the job description. Would you rather be the candidate who looks to be an 88% match or the one who is shown as a 43% match?

 

So there you have it. If you change these things you will immediately increase he likelihood of you getting interviews. Thank you for reading, I hope you found it helpful. As always, if you liked his post please share it! I love getting notifications on LinkedIn that my post has been shared (as a recruiter I am literally on there all day). Thanks again and have an awesome day!